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SwiftERM Predictive personalisation software for ecommerce

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  • David Swift
  • May 22, 2021 08:20:57 AM
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SwiftERM is predictive personalisation software for ecommerce. It identifies products that are most likely to be purchased for each individual on your database. Analysing buying habits and impressions it calculates what they are most likely to buy next. Then it provokes the purchase by sending the individual details of those products automatically.

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Wine consumption and sales strategies

Wine consumption and sales strategies. The economic crisis of these past few years has hit hard in many wine producing areas. Being couped-up at home has meant consumption has sky-rocketed, but people  have preferred less expensive products, making their purchases on the occasion of promotional sales, and increasingly more often resorting to online speciality sites, […] The post Wine consumption and sales strategies appeared first on...

Wine consumption and sales strategies. The economic crisis of these past few years has hit hard in many wine producing areas. Being couped-up at home has meant consumption has sky-rocketed, but people  have preferred less expensive products, making their purchases on the occasion of promotional sales, and increasingly more often resorting to online speciality sites, and in particular those that cater for their individual taste and personalisation

Alongside price sensitivity, consumer personalisation shows greater attention for the product׳s quality characteristics, choosing wine produced using techniques that respect the environment or are expressions of the variety and value of the region they are from. These differentiated behaviours within the general picture point out a complex system in which consumers orient their choices in a non-homogeneous manner.

Wine witnesses two apparently opposing phenomena: the increase of mass-produced wine, and the specialisation towards narrow markets, characterised by excellent product quality in terms of importance of terroir, appellation, and geographical identity. 

These tendencies are also reflected in the sales channels preferred by consumers. In this regard, the retail sales figures of wine in the principal consumer countries show that most purchases are made at large grocery stores and discount stores, where the prices are more competitive than in other shops.

Many retailers affirm that the factors that determine the purchase of wine in supermarkets are represented not only by prices, but also by the wide range of available products, the ease and efficiency of purchase, and the quality of the products. DTC sales have taken this to a new level, and across the globe online wine purchase is set to overtake tradition sources to purchase, especially as the majority of consumers have yet to award their affinity and loyalty to a particular site, so is still in it’s infancy.

Wine consumption and sales strategie

Wine attributes and purchase decisions

Various studies have confronted the theme of wine attributes that influence consumer purchasing behaviour. Price constitutes a decisive choice criterion, as well as an important sign of quality. The influence of price on choice is all the more marked for consumers who have a low involvement with wine. Moreover, several authors report that this attribute can be a strong choice driver independently of the presence of other factors: given a certain situation of consumption, the consumer indeed seems to decide the price bracket for his/her choice even before purchasing.

Various reports suggest that there are other elements connected with price that influence the consumer׳s choice. We are referring, in particular, to promotional activities, which are sales strategies widely diffused especially in ecommerce. These are implemented by means of defining different systems, such as the presence of particular signs on the label, or depth of detail divulged on your site. Often the more information you offer the greater the rate of purchase. Not only does greater detail increase it’s SEO value thereby being seen by more consumers, but when found it offers an education enjoyed, but that they would otherwise deny enjoy being provided.

The purchase of wine during a promotional sale is associated with consumers who have a low involvement with wine, as price is an important purchasing incentive. Furthermore, the choice of a product on promotional sale is associated with the consumer׳s loyalty to this very product brand: the consumers most loyal to the brand tend to stock up on their favourite brand during promotional sales and wait for another promotional sale of the brand, at the same sales outlet or at another, to purchase it again.

Given the strong tie that exists between wine quality and region in the broadest sense of the term, the country of origin constitutes a very important product attribute. Numerous authors indeed point out that it is the principal driver in wine choice, and that the presence of the wine growing region on the label increases the consumer׳s trust in the overall product quality, and indeed in turn retailer. 

Grape variety is also a product attribute that influences the consumer׳s decision to purchase wine. The importance this characteristic has on choice, however, differs according to the territorial context. In fact, in “New World” markets, it seems to replace the country of origin while in Europe, the weight of grape variety seems to be less than that of denomination of origin. In this regard, several authors claim that the greater the consumer’s involvement with wine, the greater the importance of denomination. Other attributes connected to the type of wine are colour and whether it is still or sparkling.

Brand reputation makes it possible to identify the product via a connection with the producer or with one׳s own consumption experiences. It is a quality indication, but by itself it may not prove to be a cue strong enough to orientate choice, as information like price or country of origin overrides it. The same can be said for brand loyalty, which though constituting a shortcut in product choice, does not prove decisive, as it has been shown that the consumer may change brand so as not to forfeit other characteristics. Moreover, the consumer’s behaviour towards a brand is strongly tied to the product׳s market share, which means he/she is oriented towards wines with higher market shares.

Even the bottle format can contribute to guiding choice. Several authors have indeed shown that in the choice of non-premium wines, the packaging also plays an important role. It has recently been shown that the consumer draws useful quality information about the product simply from the weight of the bottle. In this regard, a positive correlation has been pointed out between wine container weight, price, and quality of wine.

 

Discussions and conclusions

Generally speaking, an overall effect exerted by the various predictors on the performance of the wines sold can be outlined. In fact, the variables of price and promotion volume always have a positive influence on wine performances, accentuating the positivity of good results for firms with positive performances, and attenuating the negative results for the other firms. The discount variable instead always has a negative effect on performances. This means that high discount percentages are always associated with negative performances of wines. Better to stick to price-points (levels) and service these as different entities.

The variables of diffusion and specialisation has traditionally displayed a peculiar trend, differentiating their effect among the classes. The Internet has been a protagonist to change, as it transcends traditional values, with consumers being ever more educated and discerning. In fact, while the former predictor increases positivity in the case of a product that shows good performances and intensifies negativity in the case of bad performances, specialisation seems to serve as a shock absorber. It indeed attenuates both the negative performances and positive trends. Finally, the producer׳s market quota, however significant it may be, displays a positive effect on the performances of wines.

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, please add your thoughts below. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, a must for selling wines direct to the consumer Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

 

A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors
Wine DTC opportunities to take advantage of
Selling Wine DTC heralds an industry shift

The post Wine consumption and sales strategies appeared first on SwiftERM.


E-bike sales soar this summer

E-bike sales soar this summer. A new Mintel report conducted alongside 2,000 UK consumers suggests that electric bike sales rose to represent nearly a quarter of cycle sales value last year, while the number of people expected to buy a bike or e-bike in the next 12 months remains on the rise. The subject of […] The post E-bike sales soar this summer appeared first on...

E-bike sales soar this summer. A new Mintel report conducted alongside 2,000 UK consumers suggests that electric bike sales rose to represent nearly a quarter of cycle sales value last year, while the number of people expected to buy a bike or e-bike in the next 12 months remains on the rise.

The subject of whether demand will sustain as the world works its way through the pandemic is on all in the industry’s mind at present and the Mintel research has the figure at 42% of people who intend to make the investment in the coming year, versus 37% who said the same in 2020.

The findings in the report do run at odds in parts with industry research on valuations, which are based on e-commerce sales data rather than consumer surveys. Nonetheless, Mintel writes that it believes the value of the UK bicycle market rose by around 44% to reach nearly £1.2 billion in 2020, up from £825 million in 2019. Meanwhile, the Bicycle Association‘s data concludes that £1 billion was added in 2020, taking the total value to £2.31 billion. It added that bicycle sales alone surpassed £1 billion for the first time in recent datasets.

The study is nonetheless interesting as it explores topics such as where consumers bought, revealing that nearly a quarter (23%) bought bikes second-hand, a six point rise on the year prior and a situation potentially fuelled by the lack of suitable stock in the market in the second half of 2020.

John Worthington, Senior Analyst at Mintel, said: “Given the spike in demand seen during the pandemic and the supply chain challenges experienced across the industry, it is no surprise that the second-hand market has seen such a boost. With these supply issues likely to continue over the next 12 months*, there is an opportunity for local bike shops to move into the second-hand market – offering deals on servicing, enhancing and repurposing existing bikes, either for the owners themselves or to buy and sell on to new customers. Shops can enhance their green credentials by ‘upcycling’ old bikes into new improved models.”

E-bikes sale soar this summer

Electric bikes

Thought he UK has been slow in European terms to get to grips with the e-bike, the momentum is undeniably coming and Mintel put 9% of consumers owning a pedal-assisted bike versus 7% a year prior.

Mintel does estimate that 170,000 e-bikes were sold in 2020, which it says is a 70% rise year-to-year. This, it believes, accounts for one in 20 cycles bought in volume terms, but 23% in value terms.

Cross referencing with the BA data, it is believed by the association that the UK e-bike market is now worth £280 million in sales and 12% market share. Based on the trajectory of sales data, it is expected that electric bike sales may triple in the next three years. 160,000 were imported in 2020, despite market turbulence, adding 96% in value terms year-to-year.

Hybrids, sold at generally more affordable price points, rose from 15% to 22% ownership when comparing the year-to-year data. Meanwhile mountain bikes were owned by one in three of those who said they owned a bike.

21% of those surveyed reported buying a bike in the past 12 months, again an increase of 17% over the prior year’s tally. That has led the researchers to conclude the number of bikes sold reached 3.3 million, up from 2.7 million in 2019.

As far as ridership goes, 45% of the pool said they have cycled more since the start of the pandemic and 25% said they were first timers, or people that used to cycle but had returned to the saddle in the past 12 months after some time away. Overall, just under a third of adults (31%) in Britain currently cycle and around a fifth (19%) of all Brits cycle at least once a week, said the research.

Worthington added: “Cycling has been one of the clear winners during the upheaval of the past year. The perfect set of circumstances for bike sales, which the pandemic created, is likely to be a one-off ‘black swan’ event. However, there is now a solid platform for sustained growth, provided the industry can manage the supply chain challenges that have been the one major spoke in the wheel during the recent bike boom.

“Consumer engagement will be stimulated by a rising focus on health and wellness. If 2020 has largely been a renaissance of leisure cycling, cycle commuting will offer a further growth opportunity as a new band of ‘COVID cyclists’ return to the workplace. Ongoing improvements in infrastructure such as new bike lanes, pavement-widening,  and cycle-only corridors, accelerated by the pandemic, are helping to make cycling a safer activity. As the UK seeks to decarbonise its transport system, active travel now has strategic importance.”

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, please add your thoughts below. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, a must for selling bikes and accessories online Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

Online bike store rankings
Choosing a tech-stack for eCommerce Development
The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

The post E-bike sales soar this summer appeared first on SwiftERM.


A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors

A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors. The food and beverage sector has found its sweet spot when it comes to maximising the potential of digital and of online sales. With more online grocers joining and succeeding in the market (and the Amazon Effect making the e-commerce landscape even more competitive), it seems due time […] The post A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors appeared first on...

A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors. The food and beverage sector has found its sweet spot when it comes to maximising the potential of digital and of online sales. With more online grocers joining and succeeding in the market (and the Amazon Effect making the e-commerce landscape even more competitive), it seems due time for wineries to follow suit. However, with regulatory and logistical challenges still posing a big obstacle for wine e-commerce and digitisation across the industry, this has largely not yet been the case.

According to Cision, “if online grocery sales continue growing as projected while alcohol retailers underperform at the same rate [they have been, businesses in the wine industry] could lose out on $1.68 Trillion By 2025“.

An e-commerce solution, along with the embracing of digital disruptors and technological innovation in the wine industry, may be a panacea for wineries as well as for wine manufacturers and distributors. The question that remains is: how can these businesses tap this digital opportunity, and when will they do so successfully?

The top 3 challenges for online sales in the wine industry

In the US, online wine sales will grow from 5% to 20% within 5 years  (only a fraction of what’s being sold in other countries across the globe). Why? Because most wine businesses have not yet figured out how to sell (and fulfill orders) online in a way that’s simple, convenient, and profitable. Given the major hurdles on the path to success, it’s not a surprise that businesses in the wine sector are still adopting wine e-commerce extremely slowly. Here are the leading challenges:

  1. Alcohol laws and regulations vary state-to-state in the US – this restricts the transportation of wine to consumers and makes logistical challenges even more of an issue.
  2. Managing order fulfillment online becomes complicated with these regulatory constraints and additional factors like temperature control requirements paired with consumers’ growing demand for next-day and same-day delivery.
  3. The last mile of delivery is a particularly tough barrier across the industry, attributed to the need for ID verification and challenges associated with weather-related hiccups. While a large group of startups are dedicated to solving this issue, the industry has failed to perfect the last step of this process so far.
A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors

Why capitalise on digital innovation in addition to wine e-commerce?

The reasons for investing in digital in the wine industry are numerous. While wine e-commerce is a big part of the equation, there are also wine-centric apps on the rise, D2C sales skyrocketing, and emerging technologies impacting distribution, last-mile delivery logistics, and more.

Here are a few of the most notable opportunities in the industry right now.

1. Technical innovation is everywhere, but not enough businesses are adopting it

Technical innovations across production, sales and delivery, product recommendation and personalization, and consumption are just beginning to take over. Some businesses are testing things like sensors with predictive models to assist vinification and wine aging, algorithms to match customers with products based on their preferences and taste palettes, and packaging innovations including boxed, canned and single-serve formats for wine.

Although delivery services centered around getting wine at your doorstep makes up around 40% of the wine industry’s movement toward innovation, it is limited space to make improvements — and only addresses part of the problem.

The obvious next step would be to continue to improve delivery and fulfillment services while keeping our eye on how we can take better advantage of opportunities for disruption in production and personalization. Although there is much room for improvement when it comes to digital innovation, the industry has established the foundation and first steps to embracing technology.

2. Customer demand is setting a new bar for digital success

The U.S. is currently the largest market for wine in the world (consuming about 13% of the worldwide supply), which allows the American customer base to significantly impact trends in the industry.

In the U.S., wine has a much higher market share compared to other spirits when it comes to online sales, and it’s making wine e-commerce a necessary part of digital strategies for the wine industry rather than just an option.

Emerging technologies continue to improve direct-to-consumer (D2C) sales of wine in order to meet the fast and unrelenting rise of customer demand.

According to a recent Silicon Valley Bank report, the success of the wine industry online will continue to rely heavily on customer-centric approaches. As quoted in the report, “successful wineries 10 years from now will be those that adapted to a different consumer with different values — a customer who uses the internet in increasingly complex and interactive ways… Successful companies will be those that evolve retail strategies away from the winery location as the sole point of experience and find other, scalable means of delivering the experience — and the wine — to consumers where they live.”

This has already been proven true and is already impacting the market. We see disparities in how consumers buy wine online, based whether or not — for example — they live in urban or suburban neighborhoods: the former being more likely to purchase for same-day delivery and the latter more likely to order in-app for in-store pickup. Businesses must be privy to and cater to, customers based on preferences like these in order to fully lock in the opportunity in online sales.

3. D2C sales are the avenue for excellence (especially for small businesses)

Direct-to-consumer (D2C) sales in the wine industry are through the roof. The D2C wine sale market brought in $3.1 billion in 2017 and is on target to reach $5.2 billion in 2022. Currently, 62% of wineries consider D2C to be their fastest-growing sales channel; in fact, while it makes up less than 10% of total sales, it makes up an estimated 20% of total profit. Across the supply chain, e-commerce has made direct-to-consumer sales an opportunity for organizations to tap. 

For small businesses, this opportunity is even more significant. According to the same Silicon Valley Bank report, small wineries’ gross margins are doubled by selling direct-to-consumer.

The D2C trend in the industry shows no sign of slowing any time soon, and will only continue to grow as more businesses emerge and disrupt the market with new ideas and technology.

4. The e-commerce market isn’t yet cornered

When it comes to online wine sales, we’re miles from where we could be (especially in the U.S.). Currently, the top 20% of wineries selling through websites are responsible for 90% of revenue flowing through the channel. But this doesn’t mean there is no room for competitors to shake up the game.

In 2019, so few businesses in the wine industry are getting online sales right, that players who are simply participating in wine e-commerce at all are getting a massive piece of the revenue pie. Now imagine your business entered the market with a fool-proof strategy focused on convenience and customer-centricity; a significant piece of that pie could be yours.

Here are some notable industry success stories to learn from:

  • Industry leader, Naked Wines, say revenues have grown by 80% in the last six months, and D2C sales with businesses like Winc are seeing major success.
  • A leader in wine delivery services, Drizly, saw its revenue grow by 61.8%.

Your business can be the next success story, or the next cautionary tale, depending on how you approach your digital strategy.

5. Wine e-commerce web stores are decades behind UX expectations

Among the businesses in the wine industry who do have a web store or online presence, many seem to be doing the bare minimum, and it’s obvious. A summary of what the web store experience looks like today is perhaps best summed up by Silicon Valley Bank’s report:

“Few wineries have an online presence that engages the customer. Sites lack sophisticated, responsive, fully integrated designs and experiences that allow new and returning customers frictionless e-commerce.”

“The opportunity,” they say, “is wide open for a company using online tools to replace the distributor’s sales and marketing role [and using] big data to enhance outreach to consumers and improve sales opportunities.”

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, please add your thoughts below. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, a must for wine DTC. Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

Why marketing personalisation is so important
The complete guide to ecommerce marketing
Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce

The post A guide to wine ecommerce digital disruptors appeared first on SwiftERM.


Why marketing personalisation is so important

Why marketing personalisation is so important. There’s no question about it: the digital revolution has changed the way people do – and respond to – marketing. Thanks to developments like cloud solutions, data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), marketing strategies and approaches have evolved drastically in only a few years. In this quickly […] The post Why marketing personalisation is so important appeared first on...

Why marketing personalisation is so important. There’s no question about it: the digital revolution has changed the way people do – and respond to – marketing. Thanks to developments like cloud solutions, data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), marketing strategies and approaches have evolved drastically in only a few years.

In this quickly changing landscape, marketers need to work fast to keep up – but on the plus side, they have a whole new world of opportunities opened up for them to be creative. Among other things, they now rely on things like marketing personalisation to get better results. Here’s why personalising your marketing approach is so important – and why you should definitely do it.

What is marketing personalisation?

People are constantly bombarded by all kinds of information these days, be it billboard ads, TV commercials, emails, social media and hundreds of brands clamoring for their attention nonstop. So it’s only natural that we’d tune out most of that, especially what we don’t find personally relevant to us.

This means that if you’re trying to reach out to your audience with generic, impersonal content, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to engage them and encourage them to stay with you in the long run. Talking to them directly, with laser focus on what they like and are naturally interested in, is your best bet to win them over.

That’s where personalization comes in. In a nutshell, marketing personalisation means interacting with your audience and customers in a way that feels personal and human, taking into consideration their likes, preferences and interests.

A personalisation strategy can include customized email marketing campaigns, personalized ads, targeted product recommendations, tailored content and much more.

Why does it matter?

Personalisation is becoming not just a competitive advantage, but something that your customers expect through every interaction with you. 31% of customers say that they wish their shopping experience was more personalized than it currently is, and only 22% are satisfied with the level of personalisation they currently get. A Deloitte study also found that 36% of customers are interested in buying personalised products, and 48% said they would be willing to wait longer to receive it.

A survey by Evergage has found that marketers also see the value of personalisation: 96% of respondents felt that it helped them advance customer relationships, and 88% said that they perceived a measurable lift in business results. 61% also said that personalisation helped them deliver better customer experience.

The figures are clear: what customers really want is a personalised experience, tailored to their interests and needs. In fact, many now consider customer experience to be the key brand differentiator for customers, more so than price and product.

How can you use marketing personalisation?

With so many personalisation options and possibilities, things start to get complex – how are you supposed to know what each and every one of your customers likes? How can you tailor your campaigns around them individually without spending too much time on it?

That’s where automation and data analytics come in. Your customer data is the most valuable thing you can leverage in order to build the best personalised campaigns. For example, in order to build newsletters that recommend relevant content for your customers, you can automatically gather data from their previous reading history and recommend other blog posts and articles on similar or related topics.

Likewise, knowing your customers’ job title, area of expertise, topics of interest and even their geographic location can work in your favor to help you segment email marketing campaigns. But as regular readers will know segmentation is not personalisation. So only by drilling down for each individual consumer will you achieve total personalisation.

Why marketing personalisation is so important

Benefits of personalisation

 

Exceptional customer experience

Having friendly customer agents to help out your customers is great, but it isn’t enough anymore. You have to provide exceptional customer experience throughout their entire journey with you – and that includes social media interactions, automatic emails, recommendations and much more.

In fact, more and more consumers are expecting a personalised and unique journey with companies. Research conducted by Salesforce has found that customers are willing to provide more data in exchange for personalized marketing, with 58% of respondents saying that a personalized experience is very important when purchasing from a company.

In addition, 52% of consumers are somewhat likely to switch brands if a company doesn’t provide enough personalization, and 57% are willing to share personal data in exchange for personalised offers and discounts.

Increase revenue, sales and conversions

Providing a personalised service just makes business sense. If customers are getting reading suggestions and product recommendations that speak to their interests, they’re more likely to consume it. If they’re happy with the service they get and the communications they receive from you, they’re more likely to stick with you over your competitors.

It stands to reason that personalising your services and offering a customized experience will boost your sales and conversions, and the figures support it: consumers prefer buying from a brand that knows their name and purchase history, and an analysis by Forbes shows that marketers that deliver personalised web experiences are getting double-digit returns in marketing performance and response.

 

Boost customer retention

Customer retention is vital. Increasing customer retention by 5% can increase profits by 25% up to 95%, and it’s well-known that it’s cheaper to retain existing customers than to acquire new ones. Adobe’s Digital Index shows that 40% of ecommerce revenue is generated by 8% of repeat customers, and marketers in the US and Europe must bring in between 5 and 7 new shoppers to equal the revenue of just one repeat customer.

Your chances of hitting these numbers increase if you provide a personalised experience: customers are likely to become repeat buyers after a personalised experience with a company, whilst 49% have purchased a product they did not initially intend to buy after having a personalised experience.

Why marketing personalisation is so important

3 ways to personalise your marketing approach

 

Segmented email marketing

Research shows that personalised emails have 29% higher opening rates and 41% higher click-through rates, so if you want to personalise your marketing approach, segmenting email marketing communications should be at the top of your list. It’s likely that you have plenty of valuable customer data stored in your apps, like your CRM or email marketing tools, in the shape of tags, categories, labels or custom fields.

This information would enable you to divide your customers into groups based on their interests, preferences or needs. You can use this kind of data to create segmented email lists and send tailor-made messages that your customers actually want to read.

You can also segment your campaigns based on demographic data, geographic location or purchase history, and you can collect this information through sign-up forms, surveys, quizzes and user profiles that gather data about their topics of interest and preferences.

B2B companies can segment their customer base according to industry, size, revenue and location, for instance. Once this information is automatically collected, you can create intelligent workflows to automatically feed this into your email marketing tools.

You can also create customer-specific news feeds, topic pages and content collections by optimising your content topics and clusters according to what your consumers search for and like.

Predictive personalisation of email marketing

While segmenting is necessary, making each message personal to the recipient delivers the highest ROI of all martech solutions, and literally leaves segmenting for dead. Personalisation is now a big deal for marketers and for good reason. A study shown by O2 showed that adding personalisation to their eCommerce experience increased sales by 7.8% over a short period of time and that online retailers monitoring their personalisation efforts have seen increases in sales by an average of 19% across the board. For a big company, that figure is worth billions per annum. But does this provoke an instant reaction? The answer is – very rarely, as the message just hasn’t got through yet. Most companies are missing a massive chuck of turnover, which the few reap the shinny dollar.

Predictive personalisation software (where an algorithm watches all the buying habits and impressions made for each consumer individually) , using predictive analytics technologies like SwiftERM, identify consumer’s future behaviour, then rank every SKU by greatest likelihood of “that individual consumer” will purchase from all the SKUs you have listed, in order of greatest likely buying propensity. In other words, the ones they love best. CLV soars and RoR is all but eliminated. It out performs segmenting manyfold. But the art to it isn’t choosing one over the other, the seasoned marketer runs them both in tandem, to achieve maximum effect. the effect a 26x higher overall return, yes huge!

 

Targeted discounts and offers

Customers are extremely responsive to tailored discount codes and offers, and most of them actually expect it. Salesforce’s research ((https://www.salesforce.com/blog/2016/11/swap-data-for-personalised-marketing.html) found that 62% of consumers expect companies to send them tailored offers and discounts based on their previous purchases, and 57% of them are willing to exchange personal data in order to receive it.

For example, you can offer personalized discounts on similar products to the ones they’ve purchased in the past, or you can re-engage customers who haven’t interacted with you in a while by sending them coupons and offers based on their last purchase with you.

Campaign Monitor shares this example from Sephora, which combines a segmented email campaign and targeted discount offer. They sent one kind of email to VIP customers offering them a special discount on their new product line, and another kind of email to non-VIP customers.

Personalised reading and product recommendations

This is a relatively simple way to engage existing customers and re-engage older ones. By showing them similar products to those they’ve purchased in the past, or by sending them personalised reading suggestions based on the topics of their interest, they’re more likely to engage with your campaign.

For example, online publishing platform Medium asks its users to choose their topics of interest when signing up, and then uses this information to send newsletters with reading suggestions on the topics that interest them or that they’ve read about before.

Why marketing personalisation is so important

How to use your customer data for personalisation

Keep in mind that you’re not guaranteed to engage every single customer, no matter the amount of personalisation you use, but using customer data the right way can educate you on what your consumers want and the most effective ways to reach out to them. A/B testing is a great way to figure out what works best for your brand and what your customers respond most to.

In addition, remember not to overdo it – the line between personalisation and invasion of privacy is remarkably thin. Spamming your customers, asking for too much information or using information they didn’t give you can end up scaring them off – one survey has found that 28% of people don’t like it when companies use their data when they haven’t explicitly provided it first. You also need to make sure your data privacy policies are clear and compliant with regulations like GDPR.

Finally, it’s hard to come up with a killer personalization strategy if your customer data is all over the place. For example, what if your support agents gather a lot of valuable information about customers, but your marketing team doesn’t have access to it because that data is stored in a different tool? That information could make all the difference when creating segmentation or a personalised marketing campaign – but if it’s not being put to good use, it loses its value.

 

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, intended to help improve our client’s profitability. It reflects the care SwiftERM offer. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, and let us know what you think. Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing
Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce
Choosing a tech-stack for eCommerce Development

The post Why marketing personalisation is so important appeared first on SwiftERM.


The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing. This world of ecommerce marketing often seems like an intimidating one, with marketing types ranging anywhere from social media outreach to influencer engagement, and email marketing to regular advertising. However, marketing online doesn’t have to be a chore. Not only can you find the tools to help you along […] The post The complete guide to ecommerce marketing appeared first on...

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing. This world of ecommerce marketing often seems like an intimidating one, with marketing types ranging anywhere from social media outreach to influencer engagement, and email marketing to regular advertising. However, marketing online doesn’t have to be a chore. Not only can you find the tools to help you along the way, but there are plenty of tips to take advantage of in order to improve your ecommerce marketing and engage customers in new ways.

It all starts with understanding the basics of ecommerce marketing. What is it exactly? What are the various types to consider? Should you dive into all forms of marketing at once or only take on one area?

These are all excellent questions. We’re here to answer all those questions and explain the ins and outs of ecommerce marketing. That way, you’ll have a firm grasp on the opportunities available to your business, giving you a clearer view of which forms of ecommerce marketing are worth pursuing.

Keep reading to get a crash course in ecommerce marketing, from the basic definition of the practice to a collection of tips to improve your marketing, regardless of the size of your operation.

What is Ecommerce Marketing?

Ecommerce marketing involves the techniques and tools implemented by a company to find new customers and guide them through the purchasing process, while also fostering old customers. Ecommerce marketing works by sending store visitors through the customer lifecycle, obtaining those customers through the top of the ecommerce sales funnel, and eventually converting them into paying customers.

In short, ecommerce marketing helps your conversion rate, turning curious ecommerce site guests into those who pay for your products.

In general, marketing done for online stores remains online. This includes social media marketing, email marketing, and a large number of other options to reach out to new and old customers. However, prudent ecommerce store owners also know that marketing is bigger than the internet.

That’s why the entirety of ecommerce marketing includes things like word-of-mouth and in-person marketing. It’s also not out of the question to consider physical marketing tactics like TV commercials and billboards.

A successful ecommerce marketing strategy relies on a company’s ability to remain flexible and work with the right tools. There’s no telling what new technologies will come out in the future, so it’s important to not get too settled into one marketing solution for the lifetime of your business.

Overall, ecommerce marketing should be considered in your costs. There’s no way to find new customers without ecommerce marketing, so every shirt or electronic sold must also have a per-unit line in your accounting figures showing you how much it cost to acquire that customer through ecommerce marketing.

As with all ecommerce topics, there’s no one answer. An online company like Dollar Shave Club found marketing success with funny television and YouTube ads. Other online stores like MVMT Watches have podcast advertisements.

Therefore, you need to figure out the absolute best course of action for your brand. Does that mean you should make a hard push with social media influencers? Is there potential for your product to be marketed at craft shows?

In this article, we’ll help you uncover the ideal marketing channels for your business. As you read on, mark down the ecommerce marketing types that seem appealing for your business. After that, you can begin testing them one-by-one to see which are the ideal solutions.

The Different Types of Ecommerce Marketing

Keep in mind that there are probably more than nine ecommerce marketing types. These are the primary forms of marketing, especially when it comes to selling products online. We also do our best to consolidate different marketing niches into over-encompassing categories, giving you a solid view into each specific category.

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

People often confuse advertising with marketing, and vice versa. However, marketing is actually an umbrella category, and advertising falls underneath that category.

Therefore, advertising is in fact a form of marketing, and it’s extremely important to the success of an online store.

Advertising is a unique form of marketing because it entails how you directly promote your products, and it almost always involves the company paying a fee to list those advertisements in a relevant area.

Luckily, today’s online world offers incredible targeting tools for your advertising. For instance, you can advertise on places like Google and Facebook by targeting users who have already searched for similar products. You can also target based on things like demographics, age, sex, and online location.

In general, paid advertising is available in the following areas:

  • Social media websites like Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest.
  • Search engines such as Google and Bing and DuckDuckGo.
  • Other websites, whether that’s by reaching out to those websites or by utilizing an ad network.
  • Print documents like magazines and billboards.
  • Visual media such as movie theater previews or TV ads.

Tools to Help With Advertising

  • Google Ads – Your one-stop shop for building, targeting, and paying for ads that show up on Google and its network.
  • Google Merchant Center – The best way to get your products logged in the Google Shopping section of the search engine. In short, visitors can buy your products directly through Google.
  • Facebook Ads – A dashboard for configuring and target ads to go on both Facebook and Instagram.
  • Pinterest Ads – An advertisement manager where you choose an objective, insert your design and product, then launch the ad for Pinterest users to see.
  • Amazon Ads – Solutions to promote your products and brand on Amazon.
  • Bing Ads – The advertising platform to reach more customers through the Bing search engine.
  • InstagramGet your brand in front of the right people with targeted Instagram advertising campaigns.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 2: Email Marketing

Email marketing remains one of the most effective methods of marketing for both physical in-person stores and those that run exclusively online.

Sending emails to customers has many advantages. First of all, people open their emails on a regular basis. Not to mention, they tend to expect things like promotions and messages from companies, as opposed to more personal messaging on places like social media or texting.

Email marketing often serves as the first order of marketing business for online stores. The reason for this is because you can start building a subscriber list whenever you want, and many ecommerce platforms offer various ways to use email marketing.

Email messaging comes in many forms in the ecommerce world:

  • Receipts.
  • Newsletters.
  • Abandoned cart messages.
  • Promotional offers.
  • Customer loyalty emails.
  • Product recommendations.
  • Account registration messaging.
  • Re-engagement or defunct customer emails.
  • Upsells and cross-sells.

And that’s only a taste of what can be done with your email marketing campaigns. What’s great is that ecommerce platforms like Shopify and Bigcommerce and WooCommerce already have email marketing integrations. Also, popular email marketing tools like Sendinblue and Omnisend provide built-in ecommerce automation features to guide your users through the customer lifecycle.

The importance of personalisation, or more accurately predictive personalisation

Personalisation is now a big deal for marketers and for good reason. A study shown by O2 showed that adding personalisation to their eCommerce experience increased sales by 7.8% over a short period of time and that online retailers monitoring their personalisation efforts have seen increases in sales by an average of 19% across the board. 

Predictive personalisation software (where an algorithm watches all the buying habits and impressions made for each consumer individually) , using predictive analytics technologies like SwiftERM, identify consumer’s future behaviour, then rank every SKU by greatest likelihood of “that individual consumer” will purchase from all the SKUs you have listed, in order of greatest likely buying propensity. In other words, the ones they love best. CLV soars and RoR is all but eliminated. It out performs segmenting manyfold. But the art to it isn’t choosing one over the other, the seasoned marketer runs them both in tandem, to achieve maximum effect. the effect a 26x higher overall return, yes huge!

 

Tools to Help With Email Marketing

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing
  • Omnisend – One of the more powerful ecommerce marketing tools on the market. It offers integrations with the major ecommerce platforms, beautiful templates, and automated ecommerce workflows.
  • Klaviyo – An option for both email and SMS marketing through several platforms. Features include segmentation, data science use, and reporting.
  • Mailchimp – One of the most popular email marketing platforms. It’s not made specifically for ecommerce but it provides powerful automation for that purpose.
  • SwiftERM – predictive personalisation software, that runs in addition to your email software identifying and capturing each consumer’s next most likely purchase.
  • Seguno – Email marketing with targeting and recommended products, made just for Shopify.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 3: Social Media Marketing

If email marketing is the old mainstay of retail and digital marketing, social media is the wild west. Over the years, social platforms have come and gone, while popular networks evolve on a regular basis. That makes for an exciting but tricky landscape for online store owners.

However, social media generally allows companies to reach customers in a more casual setting. It also presents rare opportunities for those customers to interact with the brands through the comment and tagging features.

The most popular social networks are Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, yet many other options are available.

The interesting part about social media marketing is that some business types thrive on one network but have trouble with others. For instance, clothing brands usually find success on Instagram, while crafting or design stores go to Pinterest (although Instagram is also worthwhile for them).

Social marketing involves general posts that reach out to followers while also attempting a more organic discovery process for new customers. For instance, you may share a blog post on Facebook and see customers share that post with other people who don’t currently follow you on Facebook.

Social Ads

Another way to market on social media is through advertisements. From Facebook to Pinterest, and Instagram to Twitter, the major social networks all have advertising opportunities.

Although we touched on some of the main advertising networks on social media, here’s a list of the top contenders:

Organic Content on Social Media

Another way to market on social media is through the use of organic social content. Essentially, organic content is a fancy way of saying that you’re using the social network the way it was intended to be used.

In short, social posts include things like pictures, GIFs, videos, links, or even text-based thoughts.

A solid social content strategy is key to building your followership and giving your current customers a way to reach out to you in a less formal manner.

Selling on Social Media

Social commerce evolves all the time, and the way in which it’s configured depends entirely on the social network.

Some social platforms let you build a little ecommerce shop for processing your payments through their system. This is advantageous because your customers don’t have to leave their favorite social network. Yet, it’s also a disadvantage for your brand since they never come to your website.

Other platforms like Pinterest and Instagram allow for some variation of product tagging. Essentially, you’re able to post a picture of your new product and include a tag and link to the actual product page. This redirects them to your ecommerce website so the customer can purchase the product.

Social networks have a tendency to occasionally modify rules and capabilities for social selling (Facebook seems to do this all the time). So it can be frustrating for merchants, but potentially profitable if you locate the right system and configure a desirable social commerce section.

Tools to Help With Social Media Marketing

  • Social scheduling tools – These are great for managing your organic social content. Tools include options like Buffer and Hootsuite.
  • The social ad networks – The links are included above. Many other social networks have their own advertising systems as well.
  • Rapid social design tools – Not every online business owner is a graphic designer. Therefore, we recommend tools like Canva and Adobe Spark to find templates and quickly design beautiful social posts to fit your brand.

     

Ecommerce Marketing Type 4: Search Engine Optimisation

Marketing through search engines requires nothing more than a published website that’s accessible to those search engines to crawl your website.

An indexed website could find itself on the front page of Google or Bing for certain keywords, yet it all depends on how competitive that keyword is and what people are searching for.

Therefore, having an indexed site is usually the bare minimum when it comes to search engine optimisation (SEO).

Additional search engine marketing tactics include paid advertising (covered previously,) search engine shopping platforms (also covered earlier in this article,) and organic search improvement.

Organic SEO may sound like you sit back and let the internet work for you. And that’s certainly an option, but the opportunities for improved search engine rankings lie in your own hands.

Follow these steps to boost your search engine rankings, and in turn, bring in more potential customers:

  • Register your website domain and sitemap with the major search engines.
  • Sign up for webmaster tools when available. These modules, offered by search engines like Google and Bing, provide reports to check the success of your search engine tactics along with tips to improve.
  • Optimize your website for faster speeds and a better user experience. This usually entails optimizing larger images, making sure your website is mobile-ready, and many other areas of site cleanup.
  • Optimize product pages, and all website pages for that matter, with keywords that are not only relevant to your business but used for searching on a regular basis.
  • Create written and visual content that elevates the user experience and adds value to your brand. Blog posts, videos, and infographics provide opportunities for high-quality customer resources while also allowing you to optimize them for target keywords.
  • Optimize your checkout process. How easy is it for someone to drop a product into the online shopping cart and get checked out? Everything from the number of steps required to the speediness of the site comes into play.

Tools to Help With Search Engine Optimisation

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

 

Ecommerce Marketing Type 5: Content Creation and Optimisation

Content creation ties in nicely with search engine optimisation seeing as how the content you create tells search engines that you’re offering additional content to customers. Not to mention, blogging, video creation, and the many other forms of content creation supplement the products you sell online.

Customers love seeing behind-the-scenes photos of your brand, and they definitely appreciate tutorials or product guides to advance their understanding of the item they just bought.

For an online store, content falls into the following categories:

  • The content on your product pages.
  • Informational content on every other page of your website, including an FAQ and the homepage.
  • Your blog.
  • External content marketing like guest posting, video creation on YouTube, and even what’s posted on social media.

Content marketing efforts often work by indirectly promoting your products and offering relevant assistance for your products or the industry in which your items are sold.

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

Examples of Content to Get You Started

  • Infographics explaining the benefits of your product or the state of your industry.
  • Podcasts to talk about lifestyle choices that align with your products.
  • Behind-the-scenes photos or promotional imagery that can go on social media and your blog.
  • Blog post tutorials, how-to articles, and product roundups.
  • Videos that highlight products or show them in action.
  • Case studies to prove the effectiveness of what you’re selling.
  • eBooks or online magazines with long-form content that advises customers on in-depth strategies for relevant lifestyle changes or how to work with a product.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 6: Influencer Relationships

An influencer is someone who has a significant following in a specific niche. Celebrities are the more legitimate influencers but nowadays many people on social media are calling themselves influencers.

The idea behind this type of marketing is simple: Contact someone who has a large, relevant following. See if they’d like to promote your product in some natural way, maybe through a blog or social media post. Then you pay the influencer.

Keep in mind that you should do your homework since many people have thousands of followers on Instagram but they’re not active followers. You also want someone who would actually use your product in the first place. The partnership should make sense.

 

Tools to Help With Influencer Marketing

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing

Influencer marketing is tough because there are plenty of non-influencers who claim they have quality followings. However, you can start your search on websites like HypeAuditor or Upfluence.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 7: Affiliate Marketing

Affiliate marketing may very well be the lifeblood of the entire content creation industry. Bloggers use it, as do many recommendation platforms online.

The idea behind affiliate marketing is rather simple. A brand creates an affiliate marketing program. Bloggers/marketers sign up and promote the brand. Every purchase through a unique affiliate link sends a “finders fee” to the blogger/marketer.

For an online store, an affiliate marketing program has far more reach and potential than any influencer setup.

It’s essentially free marketing until a purchase is actually made. You set the payout structure and provide a tool for the marketers to create their own accounts and affiliate links. Those marketers recommend your products in things like newsletters, blog posts, and social media outlets.

Tools to Help With Affiliate Marketing

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing
  • GoAffPro – An excellent affiliate management app for Shopify. Other platforms like Bigcommerce and Volusion provide affiliate manager add-ons as well.
  • Affiliate Program for WooCommerce – A plugin for WooCommerce with role-based affiliate settings and all sorts of sharing tools.
  • ReferralCandy – Based more on a referral model, ReferralCandy is suitable if you’d like to give out affiliate commissions or rewards to regular customers when they recommend your company to friends and family.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 8: Shopping Experience Marketing

We call this the “shopping experience” marketing category because much of the promotional content gets presented while a user is on your website and already browsing the catalog.

The point of your on-site marketing isn’t to bombard users with repetitive popups that draw attention away from what they’re currently looking at. In fact, the entire notion of interrupting customers is a balancing act.

The key is to remain out of the way but occasionally offer more value to the customer if they want or need it.

An example of this type of marketing is a chatbox, both run by humans and bots. Many of these chat boxes answer questions about sizing and other product details. You can also recommend other products that may fit their needs.

Popups are also essential parts of on-site marketing. However, a popup should only show up once while a customer is on your site, and it must provide something of great value, like a 25% off coupon to sign up for your email list.

Other on-site, or shopping experience marketing tactics include:

  • Links to your customer support resources.
  • Guides and sizing documents.
  • Recommendations for other products.
  • Wishlist modules.
  • Case studies.
  • Testimonials.
  • Customer reviews.

Tools to Help With On-site Marketing

The complete guide to ecommerce marketing
  • Live Chat – This is an excellent chat box to integrate with any platform and utilize bots if needed.
  • Cross-Sell Related Products – Although this app is for Shopify, you can find various other add-ons for different platforms.
  • Bigcommerce Wishlists – Check with your ecommerce platform to see if wishlists are included. You may have to find a plugin or a special theme that has the functionality.
  • Customer Reviews for WooCommerce – Accumulate social proof for your products with a customer reviews panel. Again, other platforms provide apps for this too.

Ecommerce Marketing Type 9: Local Outreach

Word-of-mouth marketing is one area of local outreach, but it also involves your brand getting out into the real world to partner with other brands, visit industry events, and sell your products at markets.

As for online marketing, local outreach requires site optimisation with keywords that relate to your location.

This doesn’t apply to all online stores, but it’s an easier way to tap into a market if you focus on specific locations.

The goal is to optimize for that local area and create specific landing pages for those regions.

Top Ecommerce Marketing Tips and Strategies

Now that you have the knowledge and tools to get started with ecommerce marketing, feel free to continue reading for tips on how to improve your marketing efforts and develop a solid strategy.

Use Smart Experiments

Experimenting comes into play for many aspects of ecommerce marketing. If you’re using an online tool, chances are it has some sort of testing module to see if your marketing plan is actually on the right path.

An example of this is A/B testing for email newsletters and automated worflows.

A graphic designer gets trained to know what formats and colors sell, but unfortunately, their gut feeling isn’t good enough to compete in the world of ecommerce. You’re better off forgetting about gut feelings and chnce by making several email marketing templates and testing to see which ones perform the best.

Other testing tools include keyword research apps, visual website heatmaps, and even customer surveys.

Gain Feedback From Your Customers

A quality customer survey goes a long way to get an idea of what your customers like and don’t like about your products.

Going a bit further, you can gain more objective feedback from customers by implementing areas for them to speak their minds, whether that’s through review modules, forums, or social media.

Be sure to keep a regular eye on online review sites to accumulate data and understand what’s making customers happy or disgruntled.

Utilize Targeting and Consumer Research Before Spending Money on Marketing

Similar to A/B testing, there’s no reason to spend money on advertising if you’re targeting consumers and making your designs based on instinct or preference.

Building an ad campaign on Facebook or Google can get expensive. Therefore, you should utilize their tools for seeing which types of designs actually work for businesses like your own.

In addition, take advantage of the target marketing tools so that your ads are only showing up to people who potentially want to buy from you.

Get Creative – Don’t Just Keep Sending Out Promotions

Some companies fall flat in the personality department when all they send out are coupons and promotions.

It may seem like all your customers want are discounts, but human connection can serve a greater purpose.

Take Zappos, for instance. Early on, Zappos became known for sending out handwritten thank you cards in some boxes. They also rewarded random customers with overnight shipping. Furthermore, the Zappos website was filled with behind-the-scenes content showing the outside world how quirky and relatable the employees were.

Customers appreciate that they’re buying from real people, not some faceless company. Show them that with your creativity.

Upsell Products On a Regular Basis

An upsell often seems like a salesperson attempting to get a person to buy more stuff. Luckily, the internet makes upselling more discrete.

There are so many messages that go out to customers, from receipts to thank yous to email newsletters. All of these can include recommendations and upsells. You can show upsells in your checkout area as well. The great part is that the suggestions aren’t popping up in the customer’s face and distracting them from whatever it was they were doing before.

Think About User-generated Content as a Viable Marketing Option

User-generated content is cheap and effective. Think about ways to get your customers involved on social media or other outlets. Ask for videos using your product or run a contest asking for users to suggest ideas for your next big marketing campaign.

Make it Almost Impossible to Not See Your Customer Support Resources

There’s an unsettling trend in ecommerce to hide away customer resources like they’re something to be embarrassed about.

The footer area has become the default spot to dump a list of links leading to things like forums, blogs, and knowledgebases.

That’s strange because your customer support is one of the best complimentary marketing tools you have.

Those resources don’t have to be the first thing your customers see, but it’s not a bad idea to include them in your primary menu.

Make Sure Your Entire Site Looks Good on Mobile Devices

People shop on mobile devices, that’s no secret.

Complete rigorous testing to ensure that your website theme or design looks and functions properly on tablets and smartphones.

 

Our Conclusion on Ecommerce Marketing

If all of this ecommerce marketing talk makes you feel overwhelmed, don’t fret.

Start with one suggestion or marketing practice and see how well your company can excel at it.

The best method is to set smaller, attainable, concrete goals so success is more likely. That way, your marketing efforts gain momentum and you’ll have an easier time transitioning to a new marketing tactic.

If you have any questions about ecommerce marketing in general, let us know in the comments!

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, intended to help improve our client’s profitability. It reflects the care SwiftERM offer. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, and let us know what you think. Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce
Choosing a tech-stack for eCommerce Development
The Marketing Dilemma for Small Businesses

The post The complete guide to ecommerce marketing appeared first on SwiftERM.


Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce

Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce. In ecommerce, sustainability and growth are impossible unless you’re willing to invest resources in tools that can help you scale your business. When you first launched your business, you might have been able to keep all the plates spinning yourself but, if you want to scale, you need to get […] The post Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce appeared first on...

Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce. In ecommerce, sustainability and growth are impossible unless you’re willing to invest resources in tools that can help you scale your business.

When you first launched your business, you might have been able to keep all the plates spinning yourself but, if you want to scale, you need to get out of a fulfillment frame of mind and focus instead on optimisation and growth. That’s where tools come into play.

The problem is there are A LOT of tools out there. It’s not always easy to know where to start or what to focus on.

Marketing Tools

You need great products, and you need great management and customer service – but no matter how great your products or customer support are, you need someone whose focus is finding your customers and figuring out how to speak to them in a way that convinces them your products are the ones they’ve been looking for.

I look at it as less of a Jedi mind trick and more of a cobbler, delicately inspecting, tweaking, and improving your store’s language, pricing strategy, customer personas, and more.

1. OptimizelyTo boost conversions and improve visitor experiences, you can use Optimizely to create, launch, and analyze A/B tests on your ecommerce website. With Optimizely, you can easily and quickly A/B test copy, colors, product placement on sales pages, and even entire pages.
And in case you think CRO (Conversion Rate Optimisation) is all hocus-pocus, take a look at how to increase conversions by over 40% in about a month using Optimizely.

2. Google AdWordsTo increase brand and product exposure, you can use Google AdWords to create campaigns that drive more customers to your website. With Google AdWords, you can target specific audiences based on location or keywords, and you only pay for actual results.
What makes Google AdWords extra special is that you don’t have to create the demand – you simply need to satisfy it. Your audience is already looking for your products and keywords.

3. PhotoshopTo boost interest in your products and drive more sales, you can use Photoshop to create professional-grade product images to insert throughout your website. With Photoshop, you can customize and edit photos and graphics to establish a sense of consistency and branding that will differentiate you from competitors. Professional photo editing can also help build trust and legitimacy for your ecommerce business.

4. CanvaTo drive more engagement on your social media channels, you can use Canva to create compelling images and graphics that relate to your products or business. Canva is a good tool to use if you have little or no experience using a more robust tool like Photoshop.

5. HootsuiteTo build a stronger and more authentic brand presence for your ecommerce business on social media channels, you can use Hootsuite to schedule updates and interact with current and potential customers. With Hootsuite, you can watch what people are saying about your brand or products, schedule social media updates, and get access to powerful analytics and insights that can help you get more ROI from your efforts.

6. BuzzSumoTo develop compelling content that attracts new customers, you can use BuzzSumo to come up with the right blog post ideas. With BuzzSumo, you can search for a specific topic and see the most popular articles written about that topic. You can also get access to social media followers who have shared articles about similar topics in the past.

7. Campaign Monitor – To stay on top of your customer interactions, use Campaign Monitor to send personalized email campaigns to your customers. Using automation, you can trigger messages to be sent based on a subscriber’s location in the customer journey and increase conversion with relevant content. Use Campaign Monitor’s robust analytics to create targeted segments of your email list and send beautiful, templated emails that inspire action.

8. Syte – To give your customers the ability to interact with your inventory, use Syte and show them how your products work in their daily lives. Make your inventory searchable through a photo, or promote specific items through an image of someone using your product. Syte gives your customers the ability to click directly on your inventory to purchase and learn more.

9. Shakr – To create engaging video ads, use Shakr and start publishing high-quality video content to social media. With a stock image gallery and over 2000 video templates, Shakr gives you the ability to create professional-looking videos through their drag and drop builder. You can also perform multivariate tests to see which videos connect best with your audience.

10. MailChimpAnother email marketing service provider, you can use MailChimp to create and send regular email updates about your products to your list of subscribers and customers. For example, you could create email campaigns that offer special coupons to new customers, or you could use email to fill customers in on new products that they might be interested in.

11. WordPressTo connect with new audiences and potential customers, you can use WordPress to create and produce helpful blog posts about your products, industry, or specific pain points that relate to your target audience. If the tool you use to manage your online store doesn’t have a blog feature, WordPress is a good option to explore. It’s free, extremely easy to use, and very versatile.

12. Facebook AdsTo connect with new customers and drive them to your ecommerce site, use Facebook Ads to launch campaigns that target specific users or types of users. Facebook Ads is a great option for ecommerce businesses because the cost is relatively inexpensive compared to other options. 

13. OptiMonkTo capture more potential customers before they leave your site, use OptiMonk to create exit-intent popups to display when a visitor makes an attempt to leave your site. You can use OptiMonk to essentially retarget visitors right on your site by tracking user behavior and offering targeted offers to people who might otherwise never return to your ecommerce store.

14. Criteo To create more compelling ads for visitors, use Criteo to create and launch personalized retargeting ad campaigns. With Criteo, you can convert more shoppers by presenting them with dynamic ads that recommend the best offers and products from your catalog. The tool also allows you to optimise campaign performance by automatically selecting creative components that are likely to drive the most engagement.

15. Drift – To capture more qualified leads on who visits your site, use Drift and create conversational bots that interact with your website visitors. By setting predetermined questions and answers to commonly asked questions and tailoring these questions to different pages on your site, you can help potential new leads find the information they’re looking for quickly and boost conversation on lead generation pages. This tool also gives you the ability to connect with your support team directly for any interactions that require a more “human” touch.

Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce. In ecommerce

16. Customer.io – To automate your email interactions, use Customer.io to create relevant email campaigns based on your customer’s behavior. You can trigger transactional email to keep your customers up to date with important information and use analytics and segmentation to send relevant newsletters based on detailed customer profiles. Customer.io also integrates with a number of different services through an API.

17. AdEspresso – To optimize your Facebook Ads, use AdEspresso to create simple A/B tests to determine which ads perform better for your audiences. With robust analytics you can easily see how well your campaigns are performing. This tool will also provide suggestions on how best to optimize your campaigns to perform better for certain metrics.

18. The Obvious Social Channels – To build a loyal army of brand advocates, engage regularly and authentically on the social media channels where your target customer spends most of their time. In other words, don’t be active on every social media site because you think it’s necessary — pick the social media sites that your customers and prospective customers use most. Don’t spend all your time posting special offers and photos of your products — take the time to create meaningful relationships with the people who find and follow you on social media.

19. SwiftERM – predictive personalisation software for ecommerce marketing. PPS software comes in many forms and has many imitators. Companies offering to “segment’ data is not personalisation, as a segment by it’s very definition means lumping people together. How would you feel if addressed you as “those people”?  SwiftERM is 100% automated predictive personalisation, meaning it watches each individual consumer on your site, and their perpetual interaction with in. It monetises the data by ranking all the SKUs in order of being most likely for that person to buy. It sends details of the selection to the consumer only periodically, so it doesn’t interfere with marketing and promotional email campaigns. It delivers the highest known ROI of all known martech products.  This is a great starter solution for those who don’t have the time or money to run an email marketing campaign first.

 

Analytics Tools

You can’t grow your ecommerce store if you don’t know what’s working. Analytics is the backbone of growth. Create your hypothesis, test it, measure it – and if it worked, scale it. These are a handful of my favorite ecommerce analytics tools.

46. Google AnalyticsTo keep a pulse on how users are interacting with your pages and products, take the time to set up Google Analytics on your ecommerce website. With Google Analytics, you can track sessions, users, pageviews, conversion events, time on page, bounce rates, and more. You can also set up reports that can help you identify problems or opportunities in real-time.

47. MozMoz is another useful analytics tool for scaling an ecommerce business. With Moz, you can track keyword ranking for your site and for competitor sites, compare mobile vs. desktop rankings, find link opportunities elsewhere on the web, identify keyword opportunities, and crawl your site in order to find and fix any potentially-damaging SEO issues.

48. KissmetricsThis is another tool that offers powerful data that can be used to identify opportunities and take your ecommerce business to the next level. With Kissmetrics, you can leverage data to determine where your best customers come from, who your best customers are, and how to convert more customers on your website. The tool allows you to view revenue metrics broken down by traffic source, Funnel Reports that give you insight into what’s keeping people from checking out, and visitor profiles.

49. Taplytics – To better understand how customers interact with your product, use Taplytics to experiment, test, and track your various subscriber actions. With their web and mobile testing tools, you can create A/B tests to gather more insights on how specific customers interact with your app. Backed by real-time analytics reporting, you can iterate faster and release features smoothly based on direct customer feedback.

50. Clearbit – Tracking sales interactions and lead generation is very important as you start to scale out your business. Clearbit’s Salesforce integration will automatically update any interactions with your leads based on a number of different sources. This tool will also help track leads through the entire sales funnel, helping you know exactly when to retarget or reach out and close the deal.

51. Metrilo – By combining an analytics platform, email marketing, and a CRM under one roof, Metrilo could be the one-stop shop you’re looking for. This tool is tailored specifically to ecommerce stores and provides users with conversion tracking, sales attribution, cart abandonment, and LTV insights on a real-time basis. You can also set specific goals to track successful purchases as well as retargeting campaigns for one-time customers who have not made a purchase in a certain amount of time.

52. Social Media Analytics – To drive more engagement and conversions from social media, track and evaluate analytics from Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, or any other social site you use to interact with your target audience online. Measuring social analytics can help you understand which products and content your audience relates and responds to best. There are a lot of great aggregators of this data – but nothing beats the individual tools’ platforms for the best information.

Miscellaneous Tools

Beyond everything else we talked about above, there are other tools that need to be addressed. These are the tools that make things really fun. Tools that help you with personalization, avoiding MAP policies, and custom search are the big guns of scaling and growing your ecommerce business.

53. BloomReachThis tool can help you personalize and optimize experiences for your website and mobile apps at scale. With BloomReach, you can use the suite of tools offered to improve organic SEO, build better search functionality into your site, and present products to your visitors that are personalized in real-time based on interests. Personalization is definitely taking things up a notch, but if you’ve already figured out the rest of the tools above – then personalization is probably your next big win.

54. PriceWaiterThis tool can help you boost conversions and automate sales campaigns and offers. With PriceWaiter, you can offer pricing match capabilities on your product pages that allow visitors to make offers on your products. You can also use the tool to create compelling call-to-action offers that appear whenever a visitor who hasn’t purchased attempts to exit your website. Finally, you can use PriceWaiter to send automated drip emails containing personalized, limited-time-only offers to potential customers.

55. SearchSpringThis is another powerful personalization tool that you can use to drive more sales and grow your ecommerce business. The platform delivers the most relevant products you offer to visitors who land on your product pages. It utilizes machine learning and predictive artificial intelligence to understand product data and aggregate user behavior to surface the most relevant products across the customer journey.

56. AimtellThis tool makes it easy to re-engage website visitors with targeted mobile and desktop web push notifications. With this tool, you can send website visitors offers and reminders about your product, even when they don’t have their browser open. Installation is quick and easy and the tool integrates with WordPress and Shopify.

57. Segment – When all of your internal and external processes are working together, running a successful business gets easier. Using Segment, you can make sure that your analytics, email, helpdesk software, and more are all working seamlessly together. This tool gives you the power to connect different providers together and adjust integration settings directly while also having an open source API for developers.

58. Zapier – This platform gives you the option to connect a number of different apps together. Acting as the conduit for different services, you can use Zapier to automate your customer tracking with your payment processor or update a spreadsheet with new purchases. This is a powerful tool that helps you streamline different processes as your business grows

 

We hope you enjoyed this article, intended to help improve our client’s profitability. It reflects the care SwiftERM offer. If you haven’t already done so, then please enjoy a FREE month’s trial of our predictive personalisation software on your site, and let us know what you think. Here

 

Other articles of interest below:
(Index to all articles here)

 

Choosing a tech-stack for eCommerce Development
The Marketing Dilemma for Small Businesses
Biggest UK fashion houses by market capitalisation

The post Must-Have Tools For Scaling Ecommerce appeared first on SwiftERM.


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