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  • Phil Rosenberg
  • March 24, 2008 08:53:11 PM
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reCareered's blog publishes daily tips to help job seekers get noticed through Resume Search Optimization, and Web 2.0 tools. reCareered increases candidates' chances of getting noticed, getting an interview, and a job.

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77% Of Currently Employed Workers Compete For Your Next Job

That’s an eye-opening number if you’re looking for a job. But a recent CareerBuilder study projected that 77% of currently employed workers are searching for a new job. Let’s examine CareerBuilder’s projection. In 2010, CareerBuilder reported that 35% of currently employed workers were searching for a job – their recent projection was 220% of 2010’s...

best career advice, best job search information, career advice, job search information, job search advice, job search help, job search tips, career information, career help, career tips, career info, job search info

That’s an eye-opening number if you’re looking for a job.

But a recent CareerBuilder study projected that 77% of currently employed workers are searching for a new job.

Let’s examine CareerBuilder’s projection.

In 2010, CareerBuilder reported that 35% of currently employed workers were searching for a job – their recent projection was 220% of 2010’s figures.

If 77% of currently employed workers are searching for a new job … that means that nearly everyone is searching. In addition, these figures didn’t include unemployment figures of about 6.6% – 7%.

What changed to increase the number of people searching for work?

Let’s start by looking at the job market in 2010. Can you think back and use one word to describe the 2010 employment environment? The word would be layoffs.

In 2010, companies were announcing layoffs. Each week, as many as 5 employers announced layoffs of 1,000 or more. I should know … because I tracked layoffs each week for my “Who’s Firing” weekly series (see http://www.recareered.com/blog/tag/whos-firing/).

All of these mass layoffs were scary to more than just those directly affected. Fear of layoffs also affected workers who wanted to search for a new job. Few would take the risk of a new job, starting with a new employer with no seniority, while layoffs were happening all over.

This caused few employed workers to search for a new job while mass layoffs topped the headlines, from 2008 through 2010.

Layoffs slowed in 2011 … while they weren’t eliminated completely, layoffs slowed enough to restore confidence of those who wanted to look for new jobs. Since hiring has remained slow since 2010, many of those searching for a new job continue to search.

So now there’s a pent-up demand of workers who want to change jobs.

Currently employed workers, who aren’t being paid what they are worth are searching. Employees who haven’t seen a decent raise in years are in the job market. Salaried workers who are being asked to work evenings and weekends to cover the workload of the laid off are sick of being mistreated. Those who have had career advances shut down are looking for new jobs with promotion potential. Workers whose employers have cut back on training are seeking opportunities to learn new skills

Add to that, underemployed and part-time workers hoping to get their careers back on track also compete against you.

These pent-up demands are the 77% who are competing for your next job.

How will you show employers that you’re the best candidate when 77% of currently employed workers (plus 6.5% – 7% unemployed) are competing for your next job?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


Employers Use Your Resume And LinkedIn Profile Differently

Many job seekers make the mistake of assuming that their resume and LinkedIn profile are the same thing. There are three reasons that your resume and LinkedIn profile are not the same ...

best career advice, best job search information, career advice, job search information, job search advice, job search help, job search tips, career information, career help, career tips, career info, job search info

I’m proud to have been named a weekly columnist of Personal Branding Blog. I will be republishing my articles from that site here on reCareered. This was my article published Monday, 4/1/13 …

Many job seekers make the mistake of assuming that their resume and LinkedIn profile are the same thing.

… they’re not.

Job seekers who consider their LinkedIn profile to be equivalent to their resume can miss major opportunities to differentiate themselves resulting in lost job opportunities.

You can differentiate yourself much more effectively as a superior candidate than LinkedIn is able to provide.

LinkedIn wants you to think their service can even be your online resume, providing an option to automatically convert your profile into a traditional resume format, using the information of your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn also allows you to apply for jobs with many employers just by clicking an “apply with your LinkedIn profile” button. Don’t fall into either trap.

Sure these are easy options … but these options result in branding yourself as a commodity,

And there are three reasons that your resume and LinkedIn profile are not the same:

  1. Employers and recruiters view each differently: Employers and recruiters view your LinkedIn profile as a way to search for candidates who haven’t applied, but your resume as the primary way to apply for a job. LinkedIn recognizes that a resume is viewed differently – that’s why they offer an option to convert your profile to a resume and an option to attach your resume to your LinkedIn profile.
  2. Employers and recruiters use each for different parts of the hiring process: Employers/recruiters use LinkedIn profiles at the beginning of the process, as an introduction and as a passive candidate search mechanism. Human resources departments use LinkedIn as a way to provide social proof to your resume – to help screen out resume lies. Most employers and recruiters expect those who apply to provide a resume in the process – even those that provide an “Apply through LinkedIn” button will ask applicants for a resume.
  3. Customization and personalization: You can and should customize your resume for an individual reader – resume customization gives you the ability to brand yourself as the superior candidate. You can’t do the same thing with your LinkedIn profile, because when you change it, everyone sees the changes. You can’t control who sees a specific version of your LinkedIn profile, because everyone sees your changes. It’s difficult for your LinkedIn profile to brand you as a superior candidate, because you can’t individualize it like you can with a resume.

When you use your LinkedIn profile to apply for jobs, it will be easier but it won’t allow you to show that you’re the perfect candidate for that hiring manager, for that company, for that job. Sure, you might create that impression, but it will be through luck – you won’t be able to stack the odds in your favor.

Now that you see your resume and LinkedIn profile aren’t the same thing, how will you decide which one to use?

I’ll cover that in an upcoming article …

Article originally published by Phil Rosenberg on Dan Schwabel’s PersonalBrandingBlog.com at http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/employers-use-your-resume-and-linkedin-profile-differently/ .

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


Face To Face Personal Branding

Most job seekers personally brand themselves through their resume - it's how most communicate the first impression they make. Learn why your face to face personal brand is more memorable.

best career advice, best job search information, career advice, job search information, job search advice, job search help, job search tips, career information, career help, career tips, career info, job search info

I’m proud to have been named a weekly columnist of Personal Branding Blog. I will be republishing my articles from that site here on reCareered. This was my article published Monday, 3/25/13 …

Your resume is the traditional way job seekers create their personal brand. It’s the first impression that most job seekers make.

But there’s a downside to creating your personal brand through a resume.

Your resume is prescreened between 2-5 times before a hiring manager sees it.

What does that mean to you? It means most times you’ll never have the opportunity to make a first impression with the hiring manager, because even the best resume only gets through prescreening a small percentage of the time.

When you depend on your resume to make your first impression, it usually fails.

Let’s compare this to making your first impression face to face.

Here’s 6 reasons your face to face personal brand is more memorable:

Time Spent: You’ll have more time in front of a hiring manager face to face than they’ll spend on your resume. Since resume readers spend an average of 15 seconds on your resume and you’re likely to have many minutes face to face with a hiring manager, you should be able clearly see where you’ll have more time to make an impact.

Hiring Manager Attention: When you’re face to face, you have a much better chance to gain the hiring manager’s full attention. When scanning your resume, the hiring manager could be interrupted by a call, by email, someone stopping by to talk … literally anything could distract the hiring manager from giving full attention to your resume.

Memory: The hiring manager has a much better chance of remembering you after you’ve met face to face. Your chances of being remembered from your resume are much lower.

Sheer Numbers: The hiring manager sees hundreds of resumes … sometimes hundreds in a single day. That hiring manager will see far fewer candidates face to face, making your personal brand much more memorable when you make it face to face.

Personalization: When you’re face to face with a hiring manager you can directly ask about his/her needs and then respond, personalizing your communication to meet the hiring manager’s needs. A resume is only a one way communication, so you’ll have a tough time personalizing it without understanding the hiring manager’s needs.

And of course, Prescreening: You have much greater odds of being seen by a hiring manager going directly, rather than indirectly using a resume to gain attention. Your resume will first have to get past an automated prescreen through an applicant tracking system, through an HR rep or recruiter and up to 3 additional prescreening steps (for large employers) before you’ll get the chance to make a first impression with a hiring manger.

So what would you rather do?

Risk that your resume won’t get through prescreening and you’ll never have the chance to make a first impression?

Or extend your efforts to make your first impression with the hiring manager?

Article originally published by Phil Rosenberg on Dan Schwabel’s PersonalBrandingBlog.com at http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/face-to-face-personal-branding/ .

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


Update: 80-85% Of The U.S. Workforce Competes For Your Next Job

A CareerBuilder study late last year projected that 85% of US workers were searching for a new job - the numbers haven't changed much this year. Learn what that means for your job search ...

best career advice, best job search information, career advice, job search information, job search advice, job search help, job search tips, career information, career help, career tips, career info, job search info
That’s a huge number if you’re looking for a job.

But a CareerBuilder study projected that 77% of currently employed workers are searching for a new job … plus roughly 6% unemployment, equals 80-85% of the US workforce who compete with you for jobs. The numbers haven’t changed much since the study was published.

Let’s examine CareerBuilder’s projection.

In 2010, CareerBuilder reported that 35% of currently employed workers were searching for a job – their recent projection was 220% of their earlier figures.

If 77% of currently employed workers are searching for a new job … that means over 3/4 of currently employed workers are searching. In addition, these figures didn’t include unemployment figures of about 6%.

What changed to increase the number of people searching for work?

Let’s start by looking at the job market in 2010. Can you think back and use one word to describe the 2010 employment environment? The word would be layoffs.

In 2010, companies were announcing layoffs. Each week, as many as 5 employers announced layoffs of 1,000 or more. I should know … because I tracked layoffs each week for my “Who’s Firing” weekly series (see http://www.recareered.com/blog/tag/whos-firing/).

All of these mass layoffs were scary to more than just those directly affected. Fear of layoffs also affected workers who wanted to search for a new job. Few would take the risk of a new job, starting with a new employer with no seniority, while layoffs were happening all over.

This caused few employed workers to search for a new job while mass layoffs topped the headlines, from 2008 through 2010.

So what changed?

Layoffs slowed in 2011 … while they weren’t eliminated completely, layoffs slowed enough to restore confidence of those who wanted to look for new jobs.

Now there’s a huge pent-up demand of workers trying to change jobs, creating huge competition among job seekers today.

So who are all of these people searching for jobs?

Currently employed workers, who aren’t being paid what they are worth are searching. Employees who haven’t seen a decent raise in years are in the job market. Salaried workers who are being asked to work evenings and weekends to cover the workload of the laid off are sick of being mistreated. Those who have had career advances shut down are looking for new jobs with promotion potential. Workers whose employers have cut back on training are seeking opportunities to learn new skills.

These pent-up demands are the 77% of currently employed workers who are competing for your next job, plus the roughly 6% unemployed.

The critical question for you: How will you show employers that you’re the best candidate when you compete against 80-85% of the US workforce?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


Personal Branding By Understanding The Hiring Process

Do you realize that how well you understand the hiring process has a big impact on your personal brand … and on your chances of getting hired?

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Do you realize that how well you understand the hiring process has a big impact on your personal brand … and on your chances of getting hired?

Most job seekers think that understanding the hiring process just means learning the email address to send a resume (or URL to post). That’s really the least important understanding of the hiring process.

By understanding the hiring process, you’ll have the information that puts you ahead of your competitors – when you address what each person in the process is looking for, you look like the best candidate in the pack.

However, if you don’t understand the key information in the hiring process, you’re just guessing. By just guessing, you have a low chance of guessing right … so you’ll miss the opportunity to brand yourself as the best candidate in your written and verbal communications throughout the hiring process.

By not taking the time to truly understand the hiring process, you’ll brand yourself as an average candidate, at best.

Which do you want? To be seen as an average candidate or the superior candidate?

In order to brand yourself as a superior candidate, at a minimum you need to gain these four pieces of information:

1. Understanding all the players: You need to understand who each person in the hiring process is and how they affect the process … including the hiring decision influencers. You’ll get this by talking to people inside of the company. This is one area where you can gain value by talking to HR, because HR can describe the pre-screen stages of the hiring process and the people involved. However, once you’ve been selected for interview, you’ll want to learn about the hiring process from within the department. Only department insiders will understand who’s involved, who the hiring manager will ask to get involved. You’ll want to end up with something that looks like an organization chart, to identify each person in the hiring process.

2. Understanding the decision points: Hiring processes are usually comprised of a number of smaller decisions. It’s important to understand what these decision points are and who influences each one. At a minimum, the decision points look like this (in larger companies they can be much more complicated):

  • Which candidates get an interview slot?
  • Which candidates get asked back for a 2nd (or 3rd) interview)
  • Which candidates are considered finalists?
  • Who gets the offer?
  • Who gets the offer if the offer is rejected? Who gets 2nd place?

3. Understanding the influence: It’s one thing to identify the players, but some people in the hiring process will have greater impact than others. So you’ll want to learn who’s opinions the hiring manager seeks out … and trusts. At this point, you’re trying to learn and map out the department’s politics to see where the key points of influence are.

4. Understanding the needs: Gain an understanding of what each person in the process needs. Each individual in the hiring process has needs and if you understand what those needs are, you can often give examples of how you can help individuals in the hiring process as well as the hiring manager. Once you understand which people in the hiring process carries the most influence at each decision point, you’ll understand where you’ll want to concentrate most of your efforts to help meet influencer needs. What kinds of needs can you help hiring decision influencers with?

  • Help make the influencer’s job easier
  • Help make the influencer more effective at their job
  • Help the influencer gain visibility, stature and power within the department
  • Help the influencer look good

Once you understand the hiring process, you should know which influencers you can help and which ones have the greatest influence over the hiring manager.

Almost all of this information comes from inside the employer, more specifically from inside the hiring manager’s department. It will take some work and preparation in order to gain this inside information.

But once you do, you’ll seem like you’re reading the minds of the people who read your resume and the people you talk to … so you’ll look like the ideal candidate.

Which will you choose?

Article originally published by Phil Rosenberg on Dan Schwabel’s PersonalBrandingBlog.com.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


Information Keeps Your Personal Brand Current

The information that most candidates use is lacking … and inferior information brands you as the wrong candidate for the job. Here are 4 types of information to brand you as the right candidate for the job.

best career advice, best job search information, career advice, job search information, job search advice, job search help, job search tips, career information, career help, career tips, career info, job search info

I’m proud to have been named a weekly columnist of Personal Branding Blog. I will be republishing my articles from that site here on reCareered. This was my article published Monday, 3/4/13 …

Information keeps your personal brand current … and allows you to brand yourself as a superior candidate.

Information is power …

The information you use to shape your communications with employers is critical to your success – or lack of success in landing a job.

But the information that most candidates use is lacking … and inferior information brands you as the wrong candidate for the job.

That’s not what you want, is it?

But ask yourself … are you using any of these common but inferior information sources: public information like Google, employer websites and job descriptions?

Instead, if you want to brand yourself as the right candidate for the job, you’ll want to recognize that the information you use makes a difference.

Here are 4 types of information to brand you as the right candidate for the job

  1. Superior Information: Superior information is not public, or it wouldn’t be superior. It’s not on Google, on a company’s website or in a job description, because all candidates have access to these sources. Superior information is private, it’s more difficult to get to, but it’s worth it … because it gives you a huge advantage. You’ll find the best information inside the companies where you want to work.
  2. Current Information: Information about last years’ problems won’t help you look like a superior candidate, because employers don’t hire people who can solve last year’s problems … they hire people who can solve current and upcoming problems. Publicly available almost always describe old information (exception: PR disasters). Are you using current information, or does your information sources describe last year’s problems?
  3. Uncovers Hiring Manager Needs: So you’ve found superior information…but does that information describe the hiring manager’s needs? The employer’s overall needs may or may not affect an individual hiring manager – all hiring managers aren’t focused on solving the same problem. It takes more than just understanding an employer’s needs…the successful candidate goes deeper to understand the needs of the hiring manager.
  4. Reflects Hiring Manager Priorities: Just because a hiring manager has a problem, doesn’t mean that it’s the hiring manager’s priority. That problem may represent a minor problem, with a low payback solution. Or that problem may have high payback, but maybe the solution isn’t in this year’s budget. If you present yourself as an expert at solving a hiring manager’s problems, but problems that are not the hiring manager’s priorities, you’ve branded yourself as a superior candidate…for some other hiring manager. Instead, reflect that you’ve solved the hiring manager’s priority problems to brand yourself as the superior candidate for that hiring manager.

You have a choice …

You can use easy to find public information that is inferior and brands you as the wrong candidate for the job.

Or …

You can brand yourself using information that’s tougher to find because it’s private, but brands you as the right candidate that has solved the priority problems of that exact hiring manager.

Which will you choose?

Article originally published by Phil Rosenberg on Dan Schwabel’s PersonalBrandingBlog.com at http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/information-keeps-your-personal-brand-current/ .

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Want to do more than just complain about a bad economy?

To attend our next complimentary live webinar featuring action items to double your resume response rate and number of interviews, plus live career Q&A with Phil Rosenberg of reCareered, register at http://ResumeWebinar.com .

Available Now On Amazon: Job Search Secrets - Rethink Your Job Search Now, By Phil Rosenberg

Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

Download Job Search Secrets on Amazon

Join our mailing list for newsletters, announcements of complimentary upcoming webinars and other job search resources. Sign up at http://reCareered.com/newsletter/

For access to more information:
Connect to Phil Rosenberg on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/company/recareered.com
Like reCareered on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/reCareered
Follow Phil Rosenberg on Google+: http://gplus.to/philrosenberg
Follow reCareered on Twitter: http://twitter.com/philreCareered
Join Career Change Central on Linkedin: http://linkedin.com/e/gis/1800872

Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg


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